Comments, Likes and Followers, oh my!

It’s official, I’ve been caught up in the hype of comments, likes and followers to validate content, ideas or companies. What if it’s not real? What if, having more likes, comments or followers doesn’t actually make you more credible or worthy of adoration.

This idea jumped off the page at me today, as I read a great article online. I thought to myself, this article is amazing and worthy of sharing. However, once I reached the end of the page, there were no comments. ZERO. I’m not sure if people had shared it or not because it wasn’t a huge advertisement about it on the page. The lack of comments made me question myself. Is this article really as awesome as I thought? No one else seemed to think so.

Are things great, because we think they are or because someone else does?

1 Comment on "Comments, Likes and Followers, oh my!"

  1. When I order from Amazon the number of total reviews definitely has an impact on my purchasing decision. At least that is where it starts…
    I believe it is important that we are all responsible for doing our own research. Whether you are hiring a realtor or home inspector or purchasing a LED aquarium lighting it is important to read the reviews to get a feel for exactly why the number and rating of reviews AND exactly what service was delivered or lacking. It is nice that Amazon also lists the percentages of ratings (i.c. 60% 5 star, 10% 4 star,…) A product that has just as the same percentage of 5 stars as 2 and 1 stars would be concerning to me. If there is a 50% chance of a 5 and 4 star experience versus a 50% chance of a low-quality experience on a $200 purchase, I will be looking for a different company to purchase from.
    I will also go ahead and read the few 1 star reviews of a company that might have majority 5 and 4 stars. Hearing a 1 star reviewer rant about immature, non-consequential problems makes me feel good about the heavy 5 and 4 star reviews of that same company.
    All in all I believe reviews are akin to a meteorologist’s report, predicting the high probability of the weather you will be experiencing when doing business with a particular company or purchasing a particular product. Just because it rained when there was a 90% forecast of sunshine doesn’t mean I should stop trusting myself or trusting the meteorologist. Humans, companies, and products are all imperfect. There is a risk we take everyday when trusting professionals, brand name companies, or meteorologists to help us purchase a home, provide light to a reef aquarium or in deciding to leave my umbrella at home.
    Trust yourself! Trust that life is full of unknowns and surprises. Trust in your ability to handle it in stride all while working with very-limited information.

    B Hammond
    Magnolia Property Consultants, LLC
    http://www.TrustMagnolia.com

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